CALL FOR PAPERS: ‘On Belonging: English Conceptions of Migration and Transculturality, 1550 – 1700’,


TIDE Conference, 26 - 28 July 2018
London Campus, University of Liverpool, 33 Finsbury Square EC2A 1AG

How did early modern processes of global exchange influence English identity? How did the movement of peoples, objects, and ideas across the globe shape English concepts of self and belonging, both at home and abroad?

Join the ERC-funded ‘Travel, Transculturality, and Identity in England, 1550 – 1700’ (TIDE) project to explore these questions through a three-day interdisciplinary conference in summer 2018.

Confirmed Speakers: Raingard Esser, Katy Gibbons, Imtiaz Habib, Claire Jowitt, Beverley Lemire, Gerald MacLean, Angela McShane, Sarah Knight, Barbara Ravelhofer, Edmond Smith

We invite proposals for papers that examine human mobility both into and out of England, and that cover topics from the Tudor and Stuart periods, including (but not limited to) the following:
  • Legal and political processes of defining and regulating national identity and the rights of strangers, aliens, and foreigners, as well as of natural-born English men and women
  • The various forms of forced and voluntary global movement
  • Local and global migration patterns
  • Travellers, diplomacy, and trade
  • Migrant case studies: individual go-betweens and transcultural agents
  • The effect of mobility on English taste and consumption (from music to the arts, dietary habits to vices)
  • The role of non-English objects on English social rituals and ways of life
  • Representations of English encounters with other peoples in literary forms and imaginative discourse

We welcome interventions from a variety of approaches, methodologies, and disciplines. Please send abstracts of up to 300 words and a short biographical note including institutional affiliation (250 words) to tide@liverpool.ac.uk by 15 February 2018 for contributions in any of the following formats:
  • Traditional 20-minute papers
  • Complete panels of 3 x 20 minute or 4 x 15-minute papers
  • Roundtable discussions
  • ‘Exploration sessions’ that focus on particular research questions, provocations, or relevant ‘state-of-the-field’ discussions.

Proposals for complete panels and roundtables should have contact details of all confirmed participants.

Coordinators of exploration sessions will be expected to offer a brief introduction to their questions and methods before inviting a broader discussion with other attendees. These informal and flexible sessions will encourage helpful scholarly discussion and input for researchers (doctoral and early career, as well as more established scholars), particularly those embarking on new projects.

Conference participants will be able to sign up for exploration sessions on a first-come, first-served basis at the time of registration.

Conference fee: £80
Subsidised fee for students: £40
Conference Reception: £20

We will offer a small number of conference bursaries, which include a fee waiver and £50 travel grant for student delegates presenting a paper or organising an ‘exploration session’. Please include a separate 1-page CV and a 300-word statement in addition to your abstract if you wish to be considered for these bursaries.

Tide Project


The Bodleian Libraries Centre for the Study of the Book summer school: “The Scientific Image”

25-29 July 2018.  Course convener: Roger Gaskell.   Application form (doc)


THEMES

Origination and transfer of images; relief, intaglio and lithographic printing; the role of the author, draughtsman and printmaker; formal analysis of images; text-image relationships; bibliographical description and cataloguing; the history of scientific, technical, medical, and natural history illustration.

DESCRIPTION

This course examines the production and use of printed pictures in scientific books from the incunable period (before 1501) to the end of the nineteenth century. Diagrams and pictures are not ancillary to scientific texts: they are part and parcel of the intellectual content; ‘illustration’ is a misleading if unavoidable term. To understand the role of images, this course looks at how the production of images affects how and what theories, facts or observations can be communicated, and can be part of the making of scientific knowledge. What an author sketches or an artist draws will often be enhanced and refined in collaboration with the author in the print making process. By analysing the formal qualities of the printed image we can ask: what visual strategies of description, analysis, explanation and persuasion are deployed? We will also consider the description and cataloguing of the illustrated scientific book. The course will provide an introduction to the history of scientific illustration in the physical sciences, technology, medicine and natural history.

This course is intended for those with a strong interest in the history of scientific books and printed images. Some previous training in either art history or the history of science and the basics of analytical and descriptive bibliography will enable students to get the most out of this course, but neither one is a prerequisite. No language skills are required. In their personal statements, applicants should describe the nature of their interest in the history of the technical image and explain briefly the purposes to which they propose to put the knowledge gained from the course.

SPECIAL GUEST LECTURE: Jim Bennett

‘Printed mathematical instruments of the 16th century, bound and unbound’
Jim Bennett will discuss the use of printed mathematical instruments in the 16th century, paper machines that were operational instruments on the page of the book, or intended to be separated from the book and possibly pasted on card or wood, or even cut from the book and used independently.
COURSE STRUCTURE

Taught seminars will take place in the Bodleian Library where participants will examine original drawings, original printing blocks and plates and printed books from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries.

Printing demonstrations, led by Richard Lawrence at the Bodleian Bibliographical Press, will provide a first-hand understanding of relief, intaglio and lithographic printing.
Visits will be made to the Sherardian Library of Plant taxonomy and the Museum of the History of Science to look at original drawings, specimens and scientific instruments.

Roger Gaskell is an antiquarian bookseller specializing in scientific medical and technical books. He has lectured on scientific book illustration at the Bodleian Summer School and teaches a regular seminar, ‘Science in print’ in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, and a regular course at the Rare Book School in Virginia.

Jim Bennett is former Director of the Museum of the History of Science at the University of Oxford and curator of the Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge. His publications include London’s Leonardo: the life and work of Robert Hooke.

COURSE FEES

The fee of £500 covers tuition, refreshments and lunches. Note that accommodation is not included in the fees and securing accommodation is the responsibility of the student.

A limited number of reduced-price places are available for postgraduate students at UK universities. If you wish to be considered for one of these places, please indicate this on your application form.

A non-refundable deposit of £150 is required within two weeks of notification of admission.

The balance of the course fee is due by 25 May 2018. If you are unable to attend the course after paying the balance of the fee, this is refundable only in extraordinary circumstances.
HOW TO APPLY

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until the course is full. Your application should include a cv and a one-page letter indicating how you plan to use the knowledge gained on the course.

If you are a postgraduate student at a UK institution and wish to be considered for one of the reduced-price places, please indicate this on your application form.

Those accepted will be notified as soon as the applications have been approved.

Dr Alexandra Franklin, Project Co-ordinator Bodleian Libraries Centre for the Study of the Book Bodleian Library Broad Street Oxford OX1 3BG

E-mail: Alexandra Franklin

CALL FOR PAPERS: Decadence, Magic(k), and the Occult

Goldsmiths, University of London, 19-20 July 2018
Keynote speaker: Professor Patricia Pulham (University of Surrey)

Nineteenth-century Decadence coincided with a resurgence of esotericism, alternative religions, and a belief in magic as a rejection of secularism and science. Until now, this intersection has been most richly considered in relation to Catholicism. Most well-known is Huysmans’s tetralogy, which traces Durtal’s movement from the Black Mass to the monastery. However, Decadent literature has a much more complicated relationship with mystical, supernatural, and magical realms, one which extends beyond a simple rejection of Christian faith and has a legacy reaching beyond the long nineteenth century.

This two-day interdisciplinary conference is organized by the Decadence Research Unit at Goldsmiths. Our aim is to investigate the role of occultism and magic(k) in the Decadent literary and artistic tradition through a consideration of the relationship between Decadence and the esoteric revival of the fin de siècle, providing an opportunity to re-examine the Occult roots of Decadence and explore the wide range of artistic responses to the blurred boundaries between Decadence, mysticism, ritual, and the Dark Arts. Is the meeting of practical magic and literary esotericism indicative of a symbiotic relationship between Decadence and the Occult, or does it represent merely another aspect of the Decadent rejection of mainstream ideologies?

We welcome proposals on any aspect of Decadence from any era, in relation to magic(k) and the Occult. Papers (about 20 mins in length) might include discussion of, but are not limited to:
  • Occult/Decadent poets: Charles Baudelaire, Remy de Gourmont, Arthur Rimbaud, Jean Lorrain
  • Occult/Decadent artists: Henry de Groux, Jean Deville, Fernand Khnopff, Felicien Rops
  • Great beasts: Aleister Crowley, Joséphin Péladan, W. B. Yeats
  • Salons and sects: the Salon de la Rose+Croix, the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn
  • Satanic and occult feminism: Berthe de Courrière, Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, Althea Gyles
  • Big ‘Isms’: Spiritualism, Rosicrucianism, Neo-Paganism, Symbolism
  • Freemasonry, Theosophy, and New Age Spirituality
  • Aesthetic esotericism and Decadent occulture
  • Geomancy and liminal spatiality
  • Poetry and ritual magic(k)
  • Occlusion and the ocular
  • Music and mysticism
  • Rituals and rivalries
  • Incubi and succubi

Abstracts of 500 words plus brief biography should be sent to: dru@gold.ac.uk by 31st March 2018


Paris Summer School: History of mathematical sciences and digital approaches: the materiality of texts — networks — classifications

Paris from 2 to 6 July 2018, at the Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu – Paris Rive Gauche (UMR 7586 of the CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot), on the Jussieu campus, in the heart of the Latin Quarter of Paris.

This international summer school aims at:
  • giving a comprehensive presentation of — and opening discussions on — current opportunities offered by digital technologies: access to original documents, modes of (collaborative) edition, new opportunities to handle and search corpuses;
  • evaluating the impact of digital approaches on the methodology and research practices in the history of science;
  • raising questions on their advantages and limits concerning their actual capacity to deliver new results and open new research perspectives.

In addition to classes and lectures, workshops will be organized to enable participants to test approaches and tools on their own corpus and research data.

The speakers will include specialists in the digital humanities as well as historians of mathematics who use digital tools.

Housing and lunches will be free, offered by the summer school.

Registration is free of charge but mandatory.
To participate in the summer school, please Register Here

Should you need any further information, please contact Summer School 2018.

Website: Summer School 2018